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Tuesday, 29 October 2013 15:39

eXclusive Review: Tippmann Crossover XVR

Written by  by Joshua D. Silverman and Jennifer Silverman
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When Tippmann released the Crossover marker a while back, it was greeted with excitement that the company that traditionally catered to woodsball play would attempt to “cross over” with a paintball gun looking and shooting like something aimed more at competitive paintball, and then acceptance as players who tried the marker found it to be a solid mid-level performer.

When Tippmann released the Crossover marker a while back, it was greeted with excitement that the company that traditionally catered to woodsball play would attempt to “cross over” with a paintball gun looking and shooting like something aimed more at competitive paintball, and then acceptance as players who tried the marker found it to be a solid mid-level performer. However, the marker wasn’t perfect and players began to report back to Tippmann with a list of features they wished the Crossover included. Tippmann has clearly listened to their valued customers, as they recently released an updated, upgraded version of the Crossover marker that offers electronic, tournament-style performance and increases value thanks to a handful of additional features that make the new model, the Crossover XVR, a true winner!

The electronic Tippmann Crossover marker starts life as a solid mid-level marker, featuring an open-bolt, blow-forward spool valve operating system, a Hall-effect blade double trigger that operates in either electronic or mechanical mode, nine-volt battery power, a bottom-line-mounted pressure regulator, clamping feed neck and anti-chop eyes. Constructed from aluminum and high-strength polymers, the Crossover may be a bit longer than some tournament markers but in appearance and configuration, it fits the bill of a tournament-style gun and thanks to various programmable rates and modes of fire, it offers similar performance. However, the while the standard Crossover does a lot of things pretty well, owners and those considering becoming owners saw a few areas where, in comparison with other markers, the Crossover could stand to be kicked up a notch. The bottom-line bottle adapter and regulator doesn’t offer any type of on/off or purging capabilities, the stock barrel leaves a little bit to be desired, field stripping the marker for maintenance and cleaning requires tools and the vertical fore-grip is a bit long. Customers can own the Crossover in the same range of colors the Ford Model-T automobile came in- any color they might like, as long as it’s black.

While many companies in paintball take customer feedback and ignore it or promise to fold it into future projects, Tippmann heard their customers and have incorporated the most-requested changes and improvements to the marker into an upgraded model available right now, the Crossover XVR. Available in olive green, red or titanium silver, the Crossover XVR offers the same spool valve, anti-chop, clamping-feed, regulated  performance of the standard Crossover, but adds a venting, on/off collar to the bottom-line regulator, tool-less disassembly of the valve and bolt system for quicker, simpler maintenance, the ability to open the wrap-around grips and replace the battery without tools, an adapter allowing the use of Autococker barrels and a standard fifteen-inch, two-piece barrel with plenty of porting up front. Finally, the vertical fore-grip has been shortened. At a retail price of $429, the added expense of the XVR over the standard Crossover is truly a bargain, as we found out when we took the marker out to play at OXCC Paintball in Maryland at one of their recent scenario games.

While the Crossover XVR at two pounds, seven ounces is not the lightest paintball gun in the world, with a light motorized hopper and a 68 cubic inch, 4,500psi Ninja Compressed air bottle the marker was easy to move around with and shoulder, though for smaller or younger players it may be a bit long. Over the chronograph, our test XVR started the day with a string of 255, 259, 256. As the field limit for the day was 280, we bumped it up an notch quickly and easily via the adjusting nut at the front of the bottom-line bottle adapter/regulator and within moments my card was punched with an impressive string of 277, 275, 279. This string was even more impressive when consideration is given to the fact that this string was recorded with the two-piece Tippmann stock barrel with a bore size of .692, much larger than the Valken Redemption paint used for the day’s play. This consistency lent itself perfectly to impressive accuracy both at the target range and, more importantly, out on the field where the targets were shooting back. Even when set to PSP ramp, in fully automatic mode or in semiautomatic, the marker kept both single shots, bursts and long streams on targets near and far.

Even when duking it out with opponents shooting much more expensive markers such as Ego, ETek, Geo, Bob Long, Empire and Luxe markers, the Tippmann Crossover XVR kept up both in terms of accuracy and rate of fire, never leaving me feeling outgunned or wanting something better. Throughout the entire day of play on a breezy Fall day with temperatures in the sixties and a cloudy sky, the Crossover XVR kept up with anything shooting back at it, did so at very high rates of fire and simply refused to chop a single ball. No paintballs broke in the barrel either, and that Tippmann two-piece barrel performed admirably, not only keeping paintballs on target but doing so very quietly thanks to its plethora of porting. Players will certainly enjoy the ability to switch to an Autococker threaded barrel and use whatever they’d like, however. Finally, the XVR even proved to deliver solid air efficiency, as I shot nearly a half a hopper of paintballs at the chronograph, another full hopper and five 180-round Pinokio pods on the field and walked off with plenty of air still in the 68 cubic inch bottle.

Packed with extra features that clearly increase the value and improve the performance of the Crossover, the Tippmann Crossover XVR is an outstanding paintball marker. Fast, accurate, reliable, efficient, consistent and easy to service, the XVR, in the hands of a recreational or scenario player is more than enough marker for serious woodsball play and could easily “cross over” into tournament play in the hands of experienced, serious players.

www.Tippmann.com

MSRP $429

Read 1111 times Last modified on Saturday, 23 November 2013 13:52

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